Illness and Fevers

thermometer and pillsIn light of so many questions on our facebook page asking about what to do as far as fevers and illnesses are concerned, here are some helpful links to take a look at!

General Guidelines if Your Child is Sick, by Dr. Lawrence Palevsky, a doctor who believes in healing children naturally: “Dr. Palevsky often remarks that “children need to be allowed to experience symptoms of acute illness in order for their bodies to appropriately cleanse the wastes and toxins from their systems, and so they can go forward in their lives toward greater optimal health and wellness.” Rarely does Dr. Palevsky ever need to prescribe antibiotics for children in his practice.”

Dr. Palevsky’s page provides resources and suggestions for treating a variety of symptoms, including fever.  http://www.drpalevsky.com/general_guidance.asp

The Importance of Childhood Fever, by Dr. Tenpenny: “Childhood fevers can be frightening, mostly because they are misunderstood… Fever is certainly one of the most common reasons that parents seek medical attention for their children. In 1980, a paper published by Barton Schmitt, MD contained the results of a survey in which 81 parents were asked their understanding of fever. All parents were inappropriately worried about low-grade fever, with temperatures of 102°F (38.9°C) or less. Most parents (52 percent) believed that fever with a temperature of 104°F (40°C) or less could cause serious neurological side-effects. As a result, almost all parents in the study treated fever aggressively: 85 percent gave anti-fever medications and 68 percent sponged the child with cool water temperatures far below 102°F (39.5°C).  Their over concern was designated by Schmitt as “fever phobia.” REF: Am J Dis Child. 1980 Feb;134(2):176-81. “Fever phobia: misconceptions of parents about fevers….”” http://drtenpenny.com/the-importance-of-fever/

Tylenol: What Every User of Acetaminophen Needs to Know, by Dr. Laura Markham “Most parents think of Tylenol as a wonder drug — harmless, readily available, and a miraculous cure for teething fussiness, ear infection pain, fevers and other childhood maladies. But when an old friend’s son died recently from tylenol poisoning, I did some research. Call me naive, but I was shocked by what I learned.

Apparently, Tylenol/Acetaminophen is toxic to the human body. It causes liver poisoning. The analgesic effects derive from the liver’s attempt to fight the tylenol by releasing enzymes to break it down…” http://www.wellness.com/blogs/DrLauraMarkham/51/what-every-user-of-acetamino

514fQqhVjFL._SL75_A good book to have on hand when dealing with an ill child: How to Raise a Healthy Child In Spite of Your Doctor, by Pediatrician, Dr. Robert Mendelson. About the book: People often ask a lot of questions about fevers – how high is too high, what about febrile seizures, when to worry, etc. I find myself referring to this book every time one of my kids are sick, just to reassure myself that I am doing the right thing by not treating the fever! Dr. Mendelsohn addresses all of this and more in his book (only $7.99 on Amazon) What’s interesting is that he wrote it in 1984, and at that time wrote a whole chapter on his thoughts on vaccines, hospitals, etc…

About Raising Natural Kids

A mother of two looking to raise awareness about the everyday issues that parents face, focusing on raising children holistically.
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2 Responses to Illness and Fevers

  1. Lisa says:

    I love this digital magazine!! Thanks for sharing the wonderful articles!!!:-)

  2. zephyrrine says:

    Very interesting. thank you for posting.

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